Fight the Blight

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The Gusciora Administration seeks to combat urban blight by targeting individual City-owned houses and restoring them back to minimum standards for auction, rehabilitation, redevelopment, or eventual demolition.

The following are the current means of reducing urban blight:

1. Strategic targeting of City properties for demolition: The Department of Housing and Economic Development (HED) uses two parallel tracks for demolitions: imminent hazards and long-term strategic demolitions of city-owned properties. Imminent hazards are evaluated and taken down on a case-to-case basis according to their immediate threat to nearby residents and property. Strategic demolitions are targeted based on several factors:

  • Proximity to attractive development areas
  • History of complaints from sub code officials, residents and first responders
  • Cost effectiveness due to ability to be bundled with adjacent or nearby properties of similar condition
  • Location within ‘hot zones’ of historically high abandonment

Residents can track HED’s progress at https://trentondemolition.com, which outlines recently completed demolitions, current projects, and sites under review. The new website – which is in its beta form – allows users to see the exact location along with before and after photos for each project. Property demolitions from previous programs are still being uploaded to the webpage.

2. Adopt-A-Lot Program - permits Trenton residents to care for, improve, and make productive use of vacant properties in their neighborhoods. This program not only beautifies the properties and reduces blight, but also creates neighborhood cohesion. For more information and/or an application see "Adopt-A-Lot Program" under the "Fight the Blight Elements" tab.

3. Community Gardens Program - Residents and community organizations can use the Community Gardens program to beautify vacant lots within their neighborhoods and put them to use for educational, social, and even entrepreneurial purposes. Not only will this serve to combat urban blight, it will also offer a creative constructive outlet for concerned citizens and promote the sustainability goals of the City. We are currently in the process of creating application forms for this program. In the meantime, reach out to Daniel Roach with any questions, comments, or concerns you might have. Phone: 609-989-3533 Email: droach@trentonnj.org

The Gusciora Administration seeks to combat urban blight by targeting individual City-owned houses and restoring them back to minimum standards for auction, rehabilitation, redevelopment, or eventual demolition.

The following are the current means of reducing urban blight:

1. Strategic targeting of City properties for demolition: The Department of Housing and Economic Development (HED) uses two parallel tracks for demolitions: imminent hazards and long-term strategic demolitions of city-owned properties. Imminent hazards are evaluated and taken down on a case-to-case basis according to their immediate threat to nearby residents and property. Strategic demolitions are targeted based on several factors:

  • Proximity to attractive development areas
  • History of complaints from sub code officials, residents and first responders
  • Cost effectiveness due to ability to be bundled with adjacent or nearby properties of similar condition
  • Location within ‘hot zones’ of historically high abandonment

Residents can track HED’s progress at https://trentondemolition.com, which outlines recently completed demolitions, current projects, and sites under review. The new website – which is in its beta form – allows users to see the exact location along with before and after photos for each project. Property demolitions from previous programs are still being uploaded to the webpage.

2. Adopt-A-Lot Program - permits Trenton residents to care for, improve, and make productive use of vacant properties in their neighborhoods. This program not only beautifies the properties and reduces blight, but also creates neighborhood cohesion. For more information and/or an application see "Adopt-A-Lot Program" under the "Fight the Blight Elements" tab.

3. Community Gardens Program - Residents and community organizations can use the Community Gardens program to beautify vacant lots within their neighborhoods and put them to use for educational, social, and even entrepreneurial purposes. Not only will this serve to combat urban blight, it will also offer a creative constructive outlet for concerned citizens and promote the sustainability goals of the City. We are currently in the process of creating application forms for this program. In the meantime, reach out to Daniel Roach with any questions, comments, or concerns you might have. Phone: 609-989-3533 Email: droach@trentonnj.org

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Is there a particular location in your neighborhood that concerns you?

over 1 year

You can send a report directly to the Mayor and City Council or place a pin on our map. Include the address of the target property and report crumbling roofs, squatters, illegal activity, fire hazards, vermin, or other conditions that make it dangerous to nearby homeowners, children, and pedestrians. The properties will then be evaluated by inspectors from Trenton’s Department of Housing and Economic Development (HED) for consideration in upcoming rehabilitation, demolition, or redevelopment efforts.


Page last updated: 21 Apr 2022, 11:04 AM